Public Health Major Courses

Biology (LD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

BILD 1. The Cell (4)

An introduction to cellular structure and function, to biological molecules, bioenergetics, to the genetics of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, and to the elements of molecular biology.

BILD 2. Multicellular Life (4)

An introduction to the development and the physiological processes of plants and animals. Included are treatments of reproduction, nutrition, respiration, transport systems, regulation of the internal environment, the nervous system, and behavior. Prerequisites: BILD 1.

BILD 3. Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (4)

The first principles of evolutionary theory, classification, ecology, and behavior; a phylogenetic synopsis of the major groups of organisms from viruses to primates.

BILD 10. Fundamental Concepts of Modern Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemistry and genetics of cells and organisms; illustrations are drawn from microbiology and human biology. This course is designed for nonbiology students and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. Open to nonbiology majors only. Note: Students may not receive credit for BILD 10 after receiving credit for BILD 1.

BILD 12. Neurobiology and Behavior (4)

Introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system; topics include molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, and behavioral neurobiology. This course is designed for nonbiology students and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. Open to nonbiology majors only.

BILD 20. Human Genetics in Modern Society (4)

Fundamentals of human genetics and introduction to modern genetic technology such as gene cloning and DNA finger printing. Applications of these techniques, such as forensic genetics, genetic screening, and genetic engineering. Social impacts and ethical implications of these applications. This course is designed for nonbiology students and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. Open to nonbiology majors only. Note: Students may not receive credit for BILD 20 after receiving credit for BICD 100.

BILD 22. Human Nutrition (4)

A survey of our understanding of the basic chemistry and biology of human nutrition; discussions of all aspects of food: nutritional value, diet, nutritional diseases, public health, and public policy. This course is designed for nonbiology students and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. Open to nonbiology majors only. Note: Students may not receive credit for BILD 22 after receiving credit for BIBC 120.

BILD 26. Human Physiology (4)

Introduction to the elements of human physiology and the functioning of the various organ systems. The course presents a broad, yet detailed, analysis of human physiology, with particular emphasis towards understanding disease processes. This course is designed for nonbiology students and does not satisfy a lower-division requirement for any biology major. Open to nonbiology majors only. Note: Students may not receive credit for BILD 26 after receiving credit for BIPN 100.

COGS 17. Neurobiology of Cognition (4)

Introduction to the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics include molecular, cellular, developmental, systems, and behavioral neurobiology. Specifically, structure and function of neurons, peripheral and central nervous systems, sensory, motor, and control systems, learning and memory mechanisms. Note: Students may not receive credit for both BILD 12 and COGS 17.

Quantitative Methods (LD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

COGS 14B. Introduction to Statistical Analysis (4)

Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Tables, graphs, measures of central tendency and variability. Distributions, Z-scores, correlation, regression. Probability, sampling, logic of inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, decision theory. T-test, one and two-way Anova, nonparametric tests (Chi-square). Prerequisites: COGS 14A.

MATH 11. Calculus-Based Introductory Probability and Statistics (5)

Events and probabilities, conditional probability, Bayes’ formula. Discrete random variables: mean, variance; binomial, Poisson distributions. Continuous random variables: densities, mean, variance; normal, uniform, exponential distributions, central limit theorem. Sample statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression. Applications. Intended for biology and social science majors. Prerequisites: AP Calculus BC score of 3, 4, or 5, or MATH 10B or MATH 20B.

PSYC 60. Introduction to Statistics (4)

This course provides an introduction to both descriptive and inferential statistics, core tools in the process of scientific discovery and the interpretation of research.

Social and Behavioral Science Electives (LD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

ANTH 1. Introduction to Culture (4)

An introduction to the anthropological approach to understanding human behavior, with an examination of data from a selection of societies and cultures.

ANTH 2. Human Origins (4)

An introduction to human evolution from the perspective of physical anthropology, including evolutionary theory and the evolution of the primates, hominids, and modern humans. Emphasis is placed on evidence from fossil remains and behavioral studies of living primates. Prerequisite for upper-division biological anthropology courses.

ANTH 23. Debating Multiculturalism: Race, Ethnicity, and Class in American Societies (4)

This course focuses on the debate about multiculturalism in American society. It examines the interaction of race, ethnicity, and class, historically and comparatively, and considers the problem of citizenship in relation to the growing polarization of multiple social identities.

CGS 2B. Introduction to Critical Gender Studies: Gender and Institutions (4)

This course examines how gender organizes and is organized by institutions. Domains of inquiry may include family, education, medicine, technology, law, media, the workplace, immigration, and citizenship.

COGS 14A. Introduction to Research Methods (4)

Introduction to the scientific method. Methods of knowledge acquisition, research questions, hypotheses, operational definitions, variables, control. Observation, levels of measurement, reliability, validity. Experimentation and design: between-groups, within-subjects, quasi-experimental, factorial, single-subject. Correlational and observational studies. Ethics in research.

COMM 10. Introduction to Communication (4)

Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of communication, including language and literacy, representation and semiotics, mediated technologies and institutional formations, and social interaction. Integrates the study of communication with a range of media production (for example, writing, electronic media, film, performance). Students will not receive credit for COGN 20 and COMM 10. COMM 10 may be taken concurrently with the COMM A, B, C courses and intermediate electives. Course is offered fall, winter, and summer quarters.

ECON 1. Principles of Microeconomics (4)

Introduction to the study of the economic system. Course will introduce the standard economic models used to examine how individuals and firms make decisions in perfectly competitive markets, and how these decisions affect supply and demand in output markets.

ENVR 30. Environmental Issues: Natural Sciences (4)

Examines global and regional environmental issues. The approach is to consider the scientific basis for policy options. Simple principles of chemistry and biology are introduced. The scope of problems includes: air and water pollution, climate modification, solid waste disposal, hazardous waste treatment, and environmental impact assessment. Prerequisites: none.

ESYS 10. Introduction to Environmental Systems (4)

This course explores the interdisciplinary character of environmental issues through an examination of a particular topic (climate change, for example) from numerous disciplinary perspectives (e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, political science, and economics).

GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health (4)

Provides a foundational interdisciplinary understanding of complex global health issues and introduces major concepts and principles in global health. The course surveys the range of problems contributing to the global burden of disease and disability including infectious disease, mental illness, refugee and immigrant health, natural disasters, climate change, and food insecurity.

HDP 1. Introduction to Human Development (4)

This course introduces students to the central issues in the basic areas in human development. The course will explain relationships between biological, cognitive, social, and cultural aspects of development across the life span.

HILD 30. History of Public Health (4)

Explores the history of public health, from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current and future prospects for global health initiatives, emphasizing the complex biological, cultural, and social dimensions of health, sickness, and medicine across time and space.

LTCS 50. Introduction to Cultural Studies (4)

An introduction to cultural studies with a focus on the following areas: literary and historical studies, popular culture, women’s studies, ethnic studies, science studies, and gay/lesbian studies. Particular emphasis on the question of “cultural practices” and their social and political conditions and effects.

POLI 10 or 10D. Introduction to Political Science: American Politics (4)

This course surveys the processes and institutions of American politics. Among the topics discussed are individual political attitudes and values, political participation, voting, parties, interest groups, Congress, presidency, Supreme Court, the federal bureaucracy, and domestic and foreign policy making. Poli Sci 10 is Lecture only, and Poli Sci 10D is Lecture plus Discussion section. These courses are equivalents of each other in regards to major requirements, and students may not receive credit for both 10 and 10D.

POLI 11 or 11D. Introduction to Political Science: Comparative Politics (4)

The nature of political authority, the experience of a social revolution, and the achievement of an economic transformation will be explored in the context of politics and government in a number of different countries. Poli Sci 11 is Lecture only, and Poli Sci 11D is Lecture plus Discussion section. These courses are equivalents of each other in regards to major requirements, and students may not receive credit for both 11 and 11D.

POLI 30 or 30D. Political Inquiry (4)

Introduction to the logic of inference in social science and to quantitative analysis in political science and public policy including research design, data collection, data description and computer graphics, and the logic of statistical inference (including linear regression). POLI 30 is Lecture only, and POLI 30D is Lecture plus Discussion section. These courses are equivalents of each other in regards to major requirements, and students may not receive credit for both 30 and 30D. 

PSYC 1. Psychology (4)

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts in psychology. Topics may include human information processing, learning and memory, motivation, development, language acquisition, social psychology, and personality.

PSYC 2. General Psychology: Biological Foundations (4)

This course provides an introductory survey of the relationship between human behavior and brain function. Specific areas of emphasis include vision and other sensory processes, memory, motivation, attention, and cognition.

PSYC 3. General Psychology: Cognitive Foundations (4)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of cognitive psychology. Topics include perception, attention, memory, language, and thought. The relation of cognitive psychology to cognitive science and to neuropsychology is also covered.

PSYC 4. General Psychology: Behavioral Foundations (4)

This course provides an introduction to behavioral psychology. Topics include classical conditioning, operant conditioning, animal learning, and motivation and behavior modification.

PSYC 6. General Psychology: Social Foundations (4)

This course provides an introduction to social psychology. Topics may include emotion, aesthetics, behavioral medicine, person perception, attitudes and attitude change, and behavior in social organizations.

PSYC 7. General Psychology: Developmental Foundations (4)

This course provides an introduction to theories and research results in developmental psychology, covering infancy through adulthood.

PSYC 70. Research Methods in Psychology (4)

This course provides an overview of how to choose appropriate research methods for experimental and non-experimental studies. Topics may include classic experimental design and counterbalancing, statistical power, and causal inference in experimental and non-experimental settings. Prerequisites: PSYC 60 or equivalent.

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology (4)

An introduction to the organizing themes and ideas, empirical concerns, and analytical approaches of the discipline of sociology. The course focuses on both classical and contemporary views of modern society, on the nature of community, and on inequality, with special attention to class, race, and gender. Materials include both theoretical statements and case studies. Will not receive credit for SOCI 1 and SOCL 1A.

SOCI 2. The Study of Society (4)

A continuation of Sociology/L 1A. The focus here is on socialization processes, culture, social reproduction and social control, and collective action. As in 1A, materials include both theoretical statements and case studies. While 1B may be taken as an independent course, it is recommended that students take 1A and 1B in sequence, as the latter builds on the former. Will not receive credit for SOCI 2 and SOCL 1B.

SOCI 10. American Society: Social Structure and Culture in the U.S. (4)

An introduction to American society in historical, comparative, and contemporary perspectives. Topics will include American cultural traditions; industrialization; class structure; the welfare state; ethnic, racial, and gender relations; the changing position of religion; social movements; and political trends. Will not receive credit for SOCI 10 and SOCL 10.

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (4)

A series of case studies of the relations between society and modern science, technology, and medicine. Global warming, reproductive medicine, AIDS, and other topical cases prompt students to view science-society interactions as problematic and complex. Will not receive credit for SOCI 30 and SOCL 30.

SOCI 40. Sociology of Health-Care Issues (4)

Designed as a broad introduction to medicine as a social institution and its relationship to other institutions as well as its relation to society. It will make use of both micro and macro sociological work in this area and introduce students to sociological perspectives of contemporary health-care issues. Will not receive credit for SOCI 40 and SOCL 40.

SOCI 60. The Practice of Social Research (4)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of the design of social research. It examines the key varieties of evidence, sampling methods, logic of comparison, and causal reasoning researchers use in their study of social issues. Will not receive credit for SOCI 60 and SOCL 60.

SOCI 70. General Sociology for Premedical Students (4)

This introductory course is specifically designed for premedical students and will provide them with a broad introduction to sociological concepts and research, particularly as applied to medicine.

USP 2. Urban World System (4)

Examines cities and the environment in a global context. Emphasizes how the world’s economy and the earth’s ecology are increasingly interdependent. Focuses on biophysical and ethicosocial concerns rooted in the contemporary division of labor among cities, Third World industrialization, and the post-industrial transformation of US cities.

Public Health Sciences (LD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

FMPH 40. Introduction to Public Health (4)

This course provides an introduction to the infrastructure of public health; the analytical tools employed by public health practitioners; bio-psychosocial perspectives of public health problems; health promotion/disease prevention; quality assessment in public health; and legal and ethical concerns. Prerequisites: Restricted enrollment to freshman, sophomore, and junior standing.

FMPH 50. Primary Care and Public Health (4)

This course explores historical and current interactions, achievements and challenges of primary care and public health. It will analyze the impact of common medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, mental health disorders, and others on individuals, their families, and society. Prerequisites: Restricted enrollment to freshman, sophomore, and junior standing.

Public Health Core Disciplines (UD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

FMPH 101. Epidemiology (4)

This course covers the basic principles of epidemiology, with applications to investigations of noninfectious (“chronic”) and infectious diseases. Explores various study designs appropriate for disease surveillance and studies of etiology and prevention. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B, and upper-division standing.

FMPH 102. Biostatistics in Public Health (4)

Fundamentals of biostatistics and basic methods for analysis of continuous and binary outcomes for one, two, or several groups. Includes: summarizing and displaying data; probability; statistical distributions; central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing; comparing means of continuous variables between two groups; comparing proportions between two groups; simple and multiple linear regression. Hands-on data analysis using software and statistical applications in public health. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or COGS 14B, and upper-division standing.

FMPH 110. Health Behavior and Chronic Diseases (4)

This course introduces health behavior concepts through applications to chronic disease prevention. The focus is on smoking, dietary behaviors, and physical activity and is organized around relationships to health, measurement, influencing factors, interventions, and translation to public health practice. Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and upper-division standing.

FMPH 120. Health Policies for Healthy Lifestyles (4)

This course covers the rationale for and effectiveness of policies to influence nutrition, physical activity, and substance use behavior. Policies include legalization, taxation, labeling, produce manufacturing, warning labels, licensing, marketing, and counter-marketing practices and restrictions on use. Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and upper-division standing.

FMPH 130. Environmental and Occupational Health (4)

This core public health course addresses the fundamentals of environmental and occupational health, including identification of hazards, basic toxicology, risk assessment, prevention/protection, and regulatory/control policies. Specific environmental and occupational hazards and relevant case studies will be presented. Prerequisites: FMPH 50, FMPH 101, and upper-division standing.

USP 143. The US Health-Care System (4)

This course will provide an overview of the organization of health care within the context of the community with emphasis on the political, social, and cultural influences. It is concerned with the structure, objectives, and trends of major health and health-related programs in the United States to include sponsorship, financing, training and utilization of health personnel. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Public Health Electives within Department (UD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

FMPH 180A. Public Health Advanced Practicum I (4)

Emphasizes key public health concepts including program planning, research design, and written/oral communication skills. Seminar done in combination with research, internship, or overseas experiences, completed after FPMH 180A. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, FMPH 50, FMPH 101 or FMPH 102, and FMPH 110. Department approval required. Restricted to upper-division public health majors only (FP25).

FMPH 191 Topics in Public Health (4)

Selected topics in the field of Public Health. Prerequisites: FMPH 40; Instructor and department approval. Additional prerequisites may be required at instructor’s discretion.

FMPH 191: "Clinical Nutrition in Public Health"

Clinical Nutrition for Public Health is an introductory course in clinical nutrition that combines lectures, discussion and classroom interaction that allow the students to identify applications and translation of nutritional guidelines and recommendations into behavior.  Clinical nutrition is the study of nutrition and diet as related to the prevention and treatment of human disease.  The practical and psychosocial aspects of diet modification and food or food product availability are key aspects of clinical nutrition practice, whether individual or community-based, and irrespective of whether the goal is primary prevention or disease treatment.  Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and department approval.

FMPH 191: "Integrative Health and Public Health"

This elective examines the historical origins, scientific research, and common practices used in complementary and alternative medicine, which is now broadly defined as “Integrative Health.” The course features numerous guest lectures by healthcare providers of Integrative Health services in UCSD Health clinics as well as by healthcare providers from diverse clinics in the San Diego region. All course content is examined in terms of how Integrative Health supports Public Health.  Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and department approval.

FMPH 191: "Field Epidemiology and Outbreak Investigations"

Field Epidemiology and Outbreak Investigations consist of a series of practical epidemiological exercises developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others, and will provide the opportunity for students to apply their epidemiological and biostatistical skills to real-world situations. These exercises, which involve the investigation of emerging infectious and non-infectious health problems and are based on actual investigations done in the US and elsewhere, are highly interactive and involve the synthesis of information from diverse sources, testing the students’ knowledge base as well as critical thinking capacities. Prerequisites: FMPH 101 and department approval; completion of FMPH 102 is recommended but not required.

FMPH 191: "Planning, Conducting and Reporting Responsible and Ethical Research"

Planning, Conducting and Reporting Responsible and Ethical Research is designed to encourage inquiry of and discussion about regulations, ethical principles and organizational practices that support the responsible and ethical conduct of research. These concepts will be conveyed using select readings, current events, student-led presentations and invited guest speakers. Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and department approval.

FMPH 191: "Qualitative Research for Global Public Health"

Qualitative Research for Global Public Health provides an overview of the role of qualitative research methods in public health, with an emphasis on global research, policy, and practice. The course will focus on qualitative research as it relates to formative program design, community-based participatory approaches, and as a tool for amplifying voices and elucidating both complex social-ecological processes and internal individual experiences. Throughout the term students will work in teams to design, conduct, analyze, and report a full qualitative study on a public health topic of their choosing. This course will offer a foundation for all Public Health Majors and will show the role of research as a tool for social justice in global public health. Prerequisites: FMPH 40 and department approval.

FMPH 195. Instruction in Public Health (4)

Introduction to teaching in a public health course. As an Undergraduate Instructional Apprentice, students will attend the lectures of the course, weekly meetings with students of the course; weekly meetings with course instructor. Responsibilities may include class presentations, designing and leading weekly discussion sections, assisting with homework and exam grading, and monitoring and responding to online discussion posts. Prerequisites: A minimum of A- in the course in which the student plans to assist, a 3.0 cumulative UC GPA, instructor and department approval.

FMPH 196A. Public Health Honors Practicum I (4)

This is the first of a three-part honors series that serves as the culminating experience for BSPH majors.  Students review, reinforce and complement skills and knowledge gained throughout the BSPH program, and prepare a proposal integrating critical elements of public health research and practice. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, FMPH 50, FMPH 101 or FMPH 102, and FMPH 110 or FMPH 120. Department approval required. Restricted to upper-division public health majors only (FP25).

FMPH 198. Directed Group Study (1–4)

Investigation of Public Health topics through directed reading and discussion by a small group of students under supervision of a faculty member. P/NP grades only. FMPH 198 may be taken for credit for a combined total of four times. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, upper-division standing, completion of ninety units of UC San Diego undergraduate study, a minimum UC San Diego GPA of 2.5, consent of instructor, and a completed and approved Special Studies form.

FMPH 199 Independent Study (2-4)

Individual undergraduate study or research not covered by the present course offerings. Study or research must be under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health and approval must be secured from the faculty member prior to registering. P/NP grades only. May be taken for credit six times. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing, completion of ninety units of UCSD undergraduate study, a minimum UCSD GPA of 2.5, consent of instructor, and a completed and approved Special Studies form.

Additional Public Health Electives (UD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

AIP 197 Academic Internship Program (4)

AIP 197 is an upper-division, special studies course. AIP offers students of all majors the opportunity to intern and conduct research in diverse professional and community settings while earning 2, 4, 8 or 12 units of P/NP academic credit over the course of the quarter. Through the academic internship experience students enhance their research, critical thinking, problem-solving, and writing skills by bringing an academic lens to a question or issue related to the internship experience. Research paper and internship hour requirements correspond with the number of units elected. Prerequisites: ninety units completed; 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA; AIP department approval. Note: Internship must be preapproved by the Public Health Department and be a Public Health related internship to be applied towards the Public Health Major.

ANBI 130. Biology of Inequality (4)

Biological and health consequences of racial and social inequalities. Psychosocial stress and measurement of health impact. Effects on disease and precursors to disease, including measures of molecular biology (e.g., epigenetics, gene expression), and biomarkers of inflammation, cardiometabolic health, and immune function. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (4)

Examines aging as process of human development, from local and global perspectives. Focuses on the interrelationships of social, cultural, psychological, and health factors that shape the experience and well-being of aging populations. Students explore the challenges and wisdom of aging. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality (4)

Why is there variation of health outcomes across the world? We will discuss health and illness in context of culture and address concerns in cross-national health variations by comparing healthcare systems in developed, underdeveloped, and developing countries. In addition, we’ll study the role of socioeconomic and political change in determining health outcomes and examine social health determinants in contemporary global health problems: multidrug resistance to antibiotics, gender violence, human trafficking, etc. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 105GS. Global Health and Inequality (4)

Why is there variation of health outcomes across the world? We will discuss health and illness in context of culture and address concerns in cross-national health variations by comparing healthcare systems in developed, underdeveloped, and developing countries. In addition, we’ll study the role of socioeconomic and political change in determining health outcomes and examine social health determinants in contemporary global health problems: multidrug resistance to antibiotics, gender violence, human trafficking, etc. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

ANSC 143. Mental Health as Global Health Priority (4)

Why is mental health a global concern? This anthropological course reviews globalization, culture, and mental health. We examine issues of social suffering, stigma, and economic burden associated with mental illness, gender inequality, political violence, "global security," pharmaceutical and illegal drugs. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 144. Immigrant and Refugee Health (4)

Examines physical and mental health sequaelae of internal and transnational movement of individuals and populations due to warfare, political violence, natural disaster, religious persecution, poverty and struggle for economic survival, and social suffering of communities abandoned by migrants and refugees. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV (4)

An introductory course on HIV taught through a medical student format, with emphasis on research and experiential learning, including observation of physicians providing care for patients from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, some of whom may be underinsured/uninsured, homeless, and/or immigrants. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 147. Global Health and the Environment (4)

Examines interactions of culture, health, and environment. Rural and urban human ecologies, their energy foundations, sociocultural systems, and characteristic health and environmental problems are explored. The role of culture and human values in designing solutions will be investigated. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (4)

Introduction to global health from the perspective of medical anthropology on disease and illness, cultural conceptions of health, doctor-patient interaction, illness experience, medical science and technology, mental health, infectious disease, and health-care inequalities by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 150. Culture and Mental Health (4)

This course reviews mental health cross-culturally and transnationally. Issues examined are cultural shaping of the interpretation, experience, symptoms, treatment, course, and recovery of mental illness. World Health Organization findings of better outcome in non-European and North American countries are explored. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 164. Introduction to Medical Anthropology (4)

Basic concepts and theory of medical anthropology are introduced and applied to comparison of medical systems including indigenous and biomedical, taking into account cross-cultural variation in causal explanation, diagnosis, perception, management, and treatment of illness and disease. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

ANSC 190GS. Medicine and Healing in South Asia (4)

This course introduces students to the medical anthropology of South Asia. This course will be divided into two parts. First, we will analyze how religious, cultural, political, and economic structures impact health and well-being. Second, we will look at ethnomedicine, that is, how local systems of healing provide alternative ideas of illness and health. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

BIBC 120. Nutrition (4)

Elaborates the relationship between diet and human metabolism, physiology, health, and disease. Covers the functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, and discusses dietary influences on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. Prerequisites: BIBC 102.

BICD 136. AIDS Science and Society (4)

An introduction to all aspects of the AIDS epidemic. Topics will include the epidemiology, biology, and clinical aspects of HIV infection, HIV testing, education and approaches to therapy, and the social, political, and legal impacts of AIDS on the individual and society. Prerequisites: BILD 1, BILD 2 recommended.

BIEB 100. Biostatistics (4)

An interactive introduction to estimation, hypothesis testing, and statistical reasoning. Emphasis on the conceptual and logical basis of statistical ideas. Focus on randomization rather than parametric techniques. Topics include describing data, sampling, bootstrapping, and significance. Mandatory one-hour weekly section. Students may not receive credit for both BIEB 100 and SIO 187. Prerequisites: BILD 3 and Math 10A or 20A and Math 10B or 20B. Students may not receive credit for both BIEB 100 and SIO 187.

BIEB 152. Evolution of Infectious Diseases (4)

Treating infectious diseases is a uniquely difficult problem since pathogens often evolve, rendering today's therapies useless tomorrow. This course will provide a review of concepts and methods in evolutionary medicine, with an emphasis on microbial genomics and molecular evolution. Prerequisites: BILD 3.

BIMM 110. Molecular Basis of Human Disease (4)

An examination of the molecular basis of human diseases. Course emphasizes inherited human disorders, and some important diseases caused by viruses. Focus on the application of genetic, biochemical, and molecular biological principles to an understanding of the diseases. Course restricted to upper-division biology majors. Prerequisites: BICD 100; BIBC 100 or BIBC 102; BIMM 100.

BIMM 124. Medical Microbiology (4)

Encompasses the increasingly important areas of viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases and understanding the complex interaction between humans and infectious agents. Covers human-pathogen interactions, mechanisms and molecular principles of infectious diseases, immune responses, countermeasures by pathogens and hosts, epidemiology, and cutting-edge approaches to therapy. Prerequisites: BIBC 100 or BIBC 102.

BIMM 134. Biology of Cancer (4)

This course covers basic processes of transformation and tumor formation in a two-part format. The first section is focused on molecular and cellular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The second section discusses tumor pathology and metastasis. Open to upper-division students only. Prerequisites: BILD 1.

BIPN 108. Physiology of Exercise (4)

Course addresses the human body’s response to exercise, addressing energy metabolism and the effects of both acute and chronic exercise on function in several important organ systems. Designing training regimes and the role of exercise in health will be considered. Prerequisites: BIBC 102 and BIPN 100.

COGS 174. Drugs: Brain, Mind, and Culture (4)

This course explores how drugs interact with the brain/mind and culture. It covers evolutionary and historical perspectives, brain chemistry, pharmacology, expectancies and placebo effects, and models of addiction. It also provides a biopsychosocial survey of commonly used and abused substances. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

COGS 174GS. Drugs: Brain, Mind, and Culture (4)

This course explores how drugs interact with the brain/mind and culture. It covers evolutionary and historical perspectives, brain chemistry, pharmacology, expectancies and placebo effects, and models of addiction. It also provides a biopsychosocial survey of commonly used and abused substances. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

COMM 102C. MMPP: Practicum in New Media and Community Life (6)

A combined lecture/lab in a specially designed after-school setting in southeastern San Diego working with children and adults. Students design new media and produce special projects, and explore issues related to human development, social justice, and community life. May be taken for credit three times. Students will not receive credit for COMT 115 and COMM 102C.

COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice (4)

Examine food justice from multiple analytical and theoretical perspectives: race, class, diversity, equity, legal-institutional, business, ethical, ecological, scientific, cultural, and socio-technical. Compare political strategies of food justice organizations/movements aimed at creating healthy and sustainable food systems locally and globally. Prerequisites: COMM 10.

ECON 125. Demographic Analysis and Forecasting (4)

Interaction between economic forces and demographic changes are considered, as are demographic composition and analysis; fertility, mortality, and migration processes and trends. Course emphasizes the creation, evaluation, and interpretation of forecasts for states, regions, and subcounty areas. Econ 178 is recommended. Prerequisites: ECON 120B or MATH 181B.

ECON 130. Public Policy (4)

Course uses basic microeconomic tools to discuss a wide variety of public issues, including the war on drugs, global warming, natural resources, health care and safety regulation. Appropriate for majors who have not completed Econ 100A-B-C and students from other departments. Prerequisites: ECON 2 or ECON 100A.

ECON 131. Economics of the Environment (4)

Environmental issues from an economic perspective. Relation of the environment to economic growth. Management of natural resources, such as forest and fresh water. Policies on air, water, and toxic waste pollution. International issues such as ozone depletion and sustainable development. Prerequisites: ECON 2 or ECON 100A.

ECON 140. Economics of Health Producers (4)

Provides an overview of the physician, hospital, and pharmaceutical segments of the health sector. Uses models of physician behavior, for-profit and nonprofit institutions to understand the trade-offs facing health-sector regulators and the administrators of public and private insurance arrangements. Prerequisites: ECON 2 or ECON 100B.

ECON 141. Economics of Health Consumers (4)

Demand for health care and health insurance, employer-provision of health insurance and impact on wages and job changes. Cross-country comparisons of health systems. Prerequisites: ECON 100C.

ETHN 103. Environmental Racism (4)

This course will examine the concept of environmental racism, the empirical evidence of its widespread existence, and the efforts by government, residents, workers, and activists to combat it. We will examine those forces that create environmental injustices in order to understand its causes as well as its consequences. Students are expected to learn and apply several concepts and social scientific theories to the course material.

ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality (4)

Globalization fosters both the transmission of AIDS, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases and gross inequalities in the resources available to prevent and cure them. This course focuses on how race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nation both shape and are shaped by the social construction of health and disease worldwide.

ETHN 157. Madness and Urbanization (4)

(Cross-listed with USP 149.) This course will provide a historical and theoretical orientation for contemporary studies of the experience of mental illness and mental health-care policy in the American city, with critical attention to racial and ethnic disparities in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.

ETHN 190. Research Methods: Studying Racial and Ethnic Communities (4)

(Cross-listed with USP 129.) The course offers students the basic research methods with which to study ethnic and racial communities. The various topics to be explored include human and physical geography, transportation, employment, economic structure, cultural values, housing, health, education, and intergroup relations.

GLBH 100. Special Topics in Global Health (4)

Selected topics in Global Health. Content will vary from quarter to quarter. May be taken for credit up to four times. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development (4)

Examines aging as process of human development, from local and global perspectives. Focuses on the interrelationships of social, cultural, psychological, and health factors that shape the experience and well-being of aging populations. Students explore the challenges and wisdom of aging. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 105. Global Health and Inequality (4)

Why is there variation of health outcomes across the world? We will discuss health and illness in context of culture and address concerns in cross-national health variations by comparing healthcare systems in developed, underdeveloped, and developing countries. In addition, we’ll study the role of socioeconomic and political change in determining health outcomes and examine social health determinants in contemporary global health problems: multidrug resistance to antibiotics, gender violence, human trafficking, etc. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 110. Demography and Social Networks in Global Health (4)

This course will provide an overview of demographic principles, and their associations with maternal and child health outcomes. We will focus on demographic trends in developing countries, using research from the DHS to discuss inequalities in fertility, mortality, and morbidity. The remainder of the class will question why we see such spatial variation in many maternal and child health outcomes, with a focus on theories of social norms, and social network methods for uncovering those trends. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 111. Clinic on the Border: Health Frontiers in Tijuana (4)

Introduces students to the physical and mental health needs of vulnerable migrants and socially marginalized communities, including substance users, LGBTQ, deportees, and the homeless and medically indigent. Students will become integrated into a free clinic in Tijuana where they will obtain community-based field experiences in interacting with these populations; learn about delivering evidence-based health care in underserved settings and be introduced to issues regarding cultural appropriation. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing. Note: No more than 4 units of GLBH 111 may be used to meet UD Public Health Major Requirements.

GLBH 113. Women's Health in Global Perspective (4)

The course examines women's and girls' health throughout the world, focusing on the main health problems experienced primarily in low resource settings. This course presents issues in the context of a woman's life from childhood, through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. The course will have a strong emphasis on social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors that affect health behaviors, reproductive health, maternal morbidity/mortality, and STIs/HIV. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV (4)

An introductory course on HIV taught through a medical student format, with emphasis on research and experiential learning, including observation of physicians providing care for patients from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, some of whom may be underinsured/uninsured, homeless, and/or immigrants. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 147. Global Health and the Environment (4)

Examines interactions of culture, health, and environment. Rural and urban human ecologies, their energy foundations, sociocultural systems, and characteristic health and environmental problems are explored. The role of culture and human values in designing solutions will be investigated. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (4)

Introduction to global health from the perspective of medical anthropology on disease and illness, cultural conceptions of health, doctor-patient interaction, illness experience, medical science and technology, mental health, infectious disease, and health-care inequalities by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 150. Culture and Mental Health (4)

This course reviews mental health cross-culturally and transnationally. Issues examined are cultural shaping of the interpretation, experience, symptoms, treatment, course, and recovery of mental illness. World Health Organization findings of better outcome in non-European and North American countries are explored. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 160. Global Health Policy (4)

Students will learn fundamental principles and concepts of global health policy, law, and governance. The course will focus on identifying critical global health policy challenges and solving them using a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the perspectives of various stakeholders. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health (4)

Illustrates and explores ecologic settings and frameworks for study and understanding of global health and international health policy. Students acquire understanding of diverse determinants and trends of disease in various settings and interrelationships between socio-cultural-economic development and health. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine (4)

Explores the origin of clinical method, the hospital, internal surgery, and the medical laboratory, as well as the historical roots of debates over health-care reform, genetic determinism, and the medicalization of society. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

HISC 116. History of Bioethics (4)

The story behind the postwar rise of bioethics—medical scandals breaking in the mass media, the development of novel technologies for saving and prolonging life, the emergence of new diseases, the unprecedented scope for manipulation opened up by biology.

HISC 180. Science and Public Policy (4)

This course will explore the evolution of the institutions, ideologies, procedures, standards, and expertise that modern democratic societies have used in applying science to generate and legitimate public policy. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

LTCS 165. Special Topics: The Politics of Food

This course will examine the representation and politics of food in literary and other cultural texts. Topics may include: food and poverty, the fast food industry, controversies about seed, sustainable food production, myths about hunger, eating and epistemology, aesthetics, etc. Repeatable for credit up to three times when topics vary.

MATH 111A. Mathematical Modeling I (4)

An introduction to mathematical modeling in the physical and social sciences. Topics vary, but have included mathematical models for epidemics, chemical reactions, political organizations, magnets, economic mobility, and geographical distributions of species. May be taken for credit two times when topics change. Prerequisites: MATH 20D and either MATH 18, MATH 20F or MATH 31AH, and MATH 109, or consent of instructor.

MATH 111B. Mathematical Modeling II (4)

Continued study on mathematical modeling in the physical and social sciences, using advanced techniques that will expand upon the topics selected and further the mathematical theory presented in MATH 111A. Prerequisites: MATH 111A or consent of instructor.

MATH 181A. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I (4)

Multivariate distribution, functions of random variables, distributions related to normal. Parameter estimation, method of moments, maximum likelihood. Estimator accuracy and confidence intervals. Students completing ECON 120A instead of MATH 180A must obtain consent of instructor to enroll. Prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 109 is highly recommended. Prerequisites: MATH 180A and MATH 20F or MATH 31AH, or consent of instructor.

MATH 181B. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II (4)

Hypothesis testing. Linear models, regression, and analysis of variance. Goodness of fit tests. Nonparametric statistics. Two units of credit offered for MATH 181B if ECON 120B previously; no credit offered if ECON 120B concurrently. Prior enrollment in MATH 109 is highly recommended. Prerequisites: MATH 181A or consent of instructor.

MATH 181C. Mathematical Statistics—Nonparametric Statistics (4)

Topics covered may include the following: classical rank test, rank correlations, permutation tests, distribution free testing, efficiency, confidence intervals, nonparametric regression and density estimation, resampling techniques (bootstrap, jackknife, etc.) and cross validations. Prior enrollment in MATH 109 is highly recommended. Prerequisites: MATH 181B or consent of instructor.

MATH 181E. Mathematical Statistics—Time Series (4)

Analysis of trends and seasonal effects, autoregressive and moving averages models, forecasting, informal introduction to spectral analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 181B or consent of instructor.

MATH 183. Statistical Methods (4)

Introduction to probability. Discrete and continuous random variables–binomial, Poisson and Gaussian distributions. Central limit theorem. Data analysis and inferential statistics: graphical techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, curve fitting. (Credit not offered for Math 183 if ECON 120A, ECE 109, MATH 180A, MATH 181A, or MATH 186 previously or concurrently taken.) Prerequisites: MATH 20C (21C) with a grade of C– or better, or consent of instructor.

MATH 185. Introduction to Computational Statistics (4)

Statistical analysis of data by means of package programs. Regression, analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, principal components, Monte Carlo simulation, and graphical methods. Emphasis will be on understanding the connections between statistical theory, numerical results, and analysis of real data. Recommended preparation: exposure to computer programming (such as CSE 5A, CSE 7, or ECE 15) highly recommended. Prerequisites: MATH 11, or MATH 181A, or MATH 183, or MATH 186, or MAE 108, or ECE 109, or ECON 120A, and either MATH 20F or MATH 31AH or consent of instructor.

MATH 186. Probability Statistics for Bioinformatics (4)

This course will cover discrete and random variables, data analysis and inferential statistics, likelihood estimators and scoring matrices with applications to biological problems. Introduction to Binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions, central limit theorem, applications to sequence and functional analysis of genomes and genetic epidemiology. (Credit not offered for MATH 186 if ECON 120A, ECE 109, MATH 180A, MATH 181A, or MATH 183 previously or concurrently.) Prerequisites: MATH 20C (21C) with a grade of C– or better, or consent of instructor.

MATH 189. Exploratory Data Analysis and Inference (4)

An introduction to various quantitative methods and statistical techniques for analyzing data—in particular big data. Quick review of probability continuing to topics of how to process, analyze, and visualize data using statistical language R. Further topics include basic inference, sampling, hypothesis testing, bootstrap methods, and regression and diagnostics. Offers conceptual explanation of techniques, along with opportunities to examine, implement, and practice them in real and simulated data. Prerequisites: MATH 20F or MATH 31AH, and MATH 180A. Students who have not completed listed prerequisites may enroll with consent of instructor.

MGT 173. Project Management: Health Services (4)

This course covers efficient techniques for managing health services projects, including both the technical aspects of project management as well as the human-capital management issues associated with blending administrative and technical staff with health-care professionals. Topics include scheduling methods, milestone setting, governmental regulations, resource allocation, interpersonal skills, and performing research and development projects—all with a health services focus. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics (4)

Moral issues in medicine and the biological sciences, such as patient’s rights and physician’s responsibilities, abortion and euthanasia, the distribution of health care, experimentation, and genetic intervention. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

POLI 125B. The Politics of Food in a Global Economy (4)

This course explores emerging issues in production and consumption of food in a global economy. On production side, we discuss issues such as famine, overproduction of commercial crops, and sustainability. On consumption side, we explore issues such as fair trade, ethical consumption, and public health consequences (such as obesity). Then we discuss the roles of governments, international organizations, and communities to address these issues.

POLI 160AA. Introduction to Policy Analysis (4)

(Same as USP 101) This course will explore the process by which the preferences of individuals are converted into public policy. Also included will be an examination of the complexity of policy problems, methods for designing better policies, and a review of tools used by analysts and policy makers. Prerequisites: POLI 10 or POLI 11.

POLI 168. Policy Assessment (4)

The use of real data to assess policy alternatives. Introduction to benefit/cost analysis, decision theory, and the valuation of public goods. Applications to health, environmental, and regulatory economic policy making.

PSYC 101. Developmental Psychology (4)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of developmental psychology, including topics in cognitive, language, and social development. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 104. Social Psychology (4)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of social psychology, covering a review of the field’s founding principles, classic findings, and a survey of recent findings. Topics will include social perception, attributions and attitudes, stereotypies, social influence, group dynamics, and aggressive and prosocial tendencies. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 134. Eating Disorders (4)

This course provides an overview of the biology and psychology of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Abnormal, as well as normal, eating will be discussed from various perspectives including endocrinological, neurobiological, psychological, sociological, and evolutionary. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine (4)

This course provides an exploration of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment as they relate to psychological concepts and research and considers how the social psychological perspective might be extended into medical fields. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood (4)
This course provides an overview of psychological disorders in children. Topics may include anxiety disorders, depressive and bipolar disorders, communication and learning disorders, conduct problems, autism, and other conditions. Emphasis is placed on symptomatology, assessment, etiological factors, epidemiology, and treatment. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 173. Psychology of Food and Behavior (4)

This course provides an overview of the biological, psychological, and social influences on the psychology of food and behavior. Topics may include taste preferences and aversions and how they are learned, how culture influences food selection, and food-related behaviors across the lifespan. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 179. Drugs, Addiction, and Mental Disorders (4)

This course provides an overview of the use, abuse, liability, and psychotherapeutic effects of drugs on humans. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 181. Drugs and Behavior (4)

Develops basic principles in psychopharmacology while exploring the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs and mechanisms of action of drugs. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

PSYC 181GS. Drugs and Behavior (4)

Develops basic principles in psychopharmacology while exploring the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs and mechanisms of action of drugs. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

PSYC 188. Impulse Control Disorders (4)

This course provides an overview of problems of impulse control, which are important features of major psychiatric disorders and also of atypical patterns of behavior including pathological gambling, compulsive sex, eating, exercise, and shopping. Topics include development, major common features, treatment, and neurobiological basis of impulse control disorders. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

REV 160GS. Public Health and Epidemiology I (4)

Introduction to public health concepts and methodologies, including epidemiology, nutrition, health behavior, and public health ethics. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

REV 165GS. Public Health and Epidemiology II (4)

Focuses on epidemiology as the backbone of public health. Covers data collection and study design. Includes field work collecting data in collaboration with local agencies and health clinics. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

SIO 116. Climate Change and Global Health: Understanding the Mechanisms (4)

This course will introduce students to the public health effects of global climate change. The course will begin by understanding the climate change phenomena and explaining the direct and indirect links between climate change and human health, including the public health impacts of infectious diseases, atmospheric air pollution, and extreme weather events. The second part of the course will be dedicated to adaption and mitigation solutions with a particular focus on vulnerable populations. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

SIO 116GS. Climate Change and Global Health: Understanding the Mechanisms (4)

This course will introduce students to the public health effects of global climate change. The course will begin by understanding the climate change phenomena and explaining the direct and indirect links between climate change and human health, including the public health impacts of infectious diseases, atmospheric air pollution, and extreme weather events. The second part of the course will be dedicated to adaption and mitigation solutions with a particular focus on vulnerable populations. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

SIO 118GS. Responding to Climate Change: Possible Solutions (4)

This course will be taught in Dharamsala, India, and explores societal solutions to climate change. Course topics include mitigation and adaptation policies, including a guide to design, implement, and evaluate an adaptation policy, and the public health co-benefits of addressing climate change. Prerequisites: Students must apply for and be accepted to the Global Seminars Program.

SIO 187. Statistical Methods in Marine Biology (4)

Introduction to statistical inference. Emphasis on constructing statistics for specific problems in marine biology. Topics include probability, distributions, sampling, replication, and experimental design. Students may not receive credit for both SIO 187 and BIEB 100. Prerequisites: BILD 3 or consent of instructor.

SIO 189. Pollution, Environment and Health (4)

The goal is to understand the scope of the pollution problem facing the planet. Students will learn the properties of chemicals in the environment and survey the biological mechanisms that determine their accumulation and toxicity. Prerequisites: CHEM 6C and BILD 1 or BILD 3 or consent of instructor. (S)

SOCI 102. Network Data and Methods (4)

Social network analysts view society as a web of relationships rather than a mere aggregation of individuals. In this course, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and visualize social network data, as well as utilize these techniques to answer an original sociological research question. Prerequisites: SOCI 60, upper-division standing.

SOCI 104Q. Qualitative Interviewing (4)

This course provides students with tools to conduct original research using qualitative interviews. Students will learn how to prepare, conduct, and analyze qualitative interviews. Special emphasis will be placed on the presentation of research in written form. Will not receive credit for SOCI 104Q and SOCA 104Q. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 108. Survey Research Design (4)

Translation of research goals into a research design, including probability sampling, questionnaire construction, data collection (including interviewing techniques), data processing, coding, and preliminary tabulation of data. Statistical methods of analysis will be limited primarily to percent aging. Will not receive credit for SOCI 108 and SOCA 108. Prerequisites: SOCI 60.

SOCI 113. Sociology of the AIDS Epidemic (4)

This course considers the social, cultural, political, and economic aspects of HIV/AIDS. Topics include the social context of transmission; the experiences of women living with HIV; AIDS activism; representations of AIDS; and the impact of race and class differences. Will not receive credit for SOCI 113 and SOCB 113. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine (4)

A study of the social, intellectual, and institutional aspects of the nineteenth-century transformation of clinical medicine, examining both the changing content of medical knowledge and therapeutics, and the organization of the medical profession. Will not receive credit for SOCI 134 and SOCC 134A. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 135. Medical Sociology (4)

An inquiry into the roles of culture and social structure in mediating the health and illness experiences of individuals and groups. Topics include the social construction of illness, the relationships between patients and health professionals, and the organization of medical work. Will not receive credit for SOCI 135 and SOCC 135. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society (4)

This course will focus on recent developments in the mental illness sector and on the contemporary sociological literature on mental illness. Developments in England as well as the United States will be examined. Will not receive credit for SOCI 136F and SOCC 136B. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 137. Sociology of Food (4)

Topics include food as a marker of social differences (e.g., gender, class, ethnicity); the changing character of food production and distribution; food as an object of political conflict; and the symbolic meanings and rituals of food preparation and consumption. Will not receive credit for SOCI 137 and SOCB 137. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy (4)

(Same as USP 133.) Primary focus on understanding and analyzing poverty and public policy. Analysis of how current debates and public policy initiatives mesh with alternative social scientific explorations of poverty. Will not receive credit for SOCI 152 and SOCC 152. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

USP 101. Introduction to Policy Analysis (4)

(Same as Political Science 160AA.) This course will explore the process by which the preferences of individuals are converted into public policy. Also included will be an examination of the complexity of policy problems, methods for designing better policies, and a review of tools used by analysts and policy makers. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 129. Research Methods: Studying Racial and Ethnic Communities (4)

(Same as ETHN 190.) The course offers students the basic research methods with which to study ethnic and racial communities. The various topics to be explored include human and physical geography, transportation, employment, economic structure, cultural values, housing, health, education, and intergroup relations. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 133. Social Inequality and Public Policy (4)

(Same as SOC 152.) Primary focus on understanding and analyzing poverty and public policy. Analysis of how current debates and public policy initiatives mesh with alternative social scientific explanations of poverty. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

USP 136. Collaborative Community Leadership (4)

Provides an overview of collaborative leadership and considers consensus organizing as both a tactical and strategic approach to effective community building and development. Examines how various communities have approached collaborative leadership, consensus organizing, and community building. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

USP 141A. Life Course Scholars Research and Core Fundamentals (6)

This course introduces students to major concepts, demographic trends, and the diversity of the aging experience. Through site visits, community-based research, and interactions with elders, students will understand the social and structural determinants of health and well-being across the life course. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing and department approval.

USP 141B. Life Course Scholars Capstone Project (6)

In this course, students deepen and apply their knowledge of policy, research, practice, and diverse perspectives on aging. Students participate in collaborative learning and research with local elders, and develop and implement a capstone "healthy aging project" in the community. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP 141A.

USP 144. Environmental and Preventive Health Issues (4)

This course will analyze needs of populations, highlighting current major public health problems such as chronic and communicable diseases, environmental hazards of diseases, psychiatric problems and additional diseases, new social mores affecting health maintenance, consumer health awareness and health practices, special needs of economically and socially disadvantaged populations. The focus is on selected areas of public and environmental health, namely: epidemiology, preventive services in family health, communicable and chronic disease control, and occupational health. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 145. Aging—Social and Health Policy Issues (4)

This course will provide a brief introduction to the nature and problems of aging, with emphasis on socioeconomic and health status; determinants of priorities of social and health policies will be examined through analysis of the structure and organization of selected programs for the elderly. Field visits will constitute part of the course. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

USP 146. Research Methods for Built Environment and Active Living (4)

This course examines urban design's effects on physical activity. In field experience settings, students will learn about survey, accelerometer, observation, and GIS methods. Quality control, use of protocols, relevance to all ages, and international applications will also be emphasized. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing.

USP 147. Case Studies in Health-Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Population (4)

The purpose of this course is to identify the special health needs of low income and underserved populations and to review their status of care, factors influencing the incidence of disease and health problems, and political and legislative measures related to access and the provision of care. Selected current programs and policies that address the health-care needs of selected underserved populations such as working poor, inner city populations, recent immigrants, and persons with severe disabling mental illnesses will be studied. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 149. Madness and Urbanization (4)

This course will provide a historical and theoretical orientation for contemporary studies of the experience of mental illness and mental health-care policy in the American city, with critical attention to racial and ethnic disparities in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Prerequisites: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Public Health Capstone (UD)

For a complete list of course descriptions please see UCSD's General Catalog.

FPMH 193. Public Health Capstone I (4)

This is the first of a two-part capstone series that serves as the culminating experience for BSPH majors.  Students will integrate the skills and knowledge gained throughout the BSPH program and learn critical elements of public health research and practice. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, FMPH 50, FMPH 101, FMPH 102, and FMPH 110.

FPMH 194. Public Health Capstone II (4)

This is the second of a two-part capstone series that serves as the culminating experience for BSPH majors.  Students will interpret and contextualize findings from their projects completed in the first part of the series.  Oral and written presentations will focus on disseminating public health information in diverse formats. Prerequisites: FMPH 40, FMPH 50, FMPH 101, FMPH 102, FMPH 110, FMPH 120, and FMPH 193. 

 

Students accepted into the Advanced Practicum may use FMPH 180B and FMPH 180C to satisfy the entire capstone experience area requirement (in place of FMPH 193 and FMPH 194).

 FMPH 180B. Public Health Advanced Practicum II (4)

Seminar participants will engage in an experiential learning program at a pre-approved practicum site. Students will participate in applied public health research and/or programs under supervision of UCSD faculty. Prerequisites: FMPH 180A or FMPH 196A; Instructor and department approval.

FMPH 180C. Public Health Advanced Practicum III (4)

Seminar participants will interpret and contextualize findings from experiential learning program planned in 180A and completed during 180B. Oral and written presentations will focus on disseminating public health information in diverse formats. Prerequisites: FMPH 180B.

 

Students accepted into the Public Health Honors Program may use FMPH 196B and FMPH 196C to satisfy the entire capstone experience area requirement (in place of FMPH 193 and FMPH 194).

 FMPH 196B. Public Health Honors Practicum II (4)

This is the second of a three-part honors series that serves as the culminating experience for BSPH majors.  This course represents an experiential learning opportunity at a pre-approved community site. Under supervision of public health faculty and pertinent site representatives, students will refine and implement the public health proposal developed in the first part of the honors series. Prerequisites: FMPH 196A; Instructor and department approval. 

FMPH 196C. Public Health Honors Practicum III (4)

This is the third of a three-part honors series that serves as the culminating experience for BSPH majors.  Students will analyze, interpret, and contextualize findings from their projects completed in the series. Oral and written communication will focus on disseminating public health information in diverse formats, and will include a presentation and an honors thesis. Prerequisites: FMPH 196B.